Home Black History Jada Pinkett-Smith Questions Hillary Clinton’s Intentions For Black People In This Heartfelt Post
Jada Pinkett-Smith Questions Hillary Clinton’s Intentions For Black People In This Heartfelt Post

Jada Pinkett-Smith Questions Hillary Clinton’s Intentions For Black People In This Heartfelt Post

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by Raveen Johnson

When we all caught wind that Hillary Clinton was an official candidate for the 2016 presidential election, the majority of our community was excited. We were all sold, and we just knew that our vote would go straight to Clinton. But one woman was not so quick to hop on Clinton’s bandwagon.

Jada Pinkett-Smith made a chilling, but painfully true Facebook post a couple of days ago about her feelings towards Hilary Clinton’s campaign, and it gave us something to think about as we consider who to elect for our next president.

“The only question I have been asking myself is if I’m suppose to vote for Hillary because she is a woman; will she take us to the mountaintop with her or will women of color once again be left out and left behind?” Smith asked.

She asked a question that so many women of color kept in the back of their minds, and I am glad that she spoke up about the matter. You see, women of color have always had more strikes against them than any other woman. Women, in general, are already fighting for their equal place in this society through feminism, but women of color? Oh, it is another story.

The feminist movement screams equality for all women, but when it comes time to speak up for the black woman, these loyal feminists are quiet. The struggle for white women and that of black women have always been on different spectrums, even though the cause is similar. Women make less than men, but black women make less than white women. Who will fight to change that? Hillary Clinton?

“Women of color and white women have been taking on the majority of their fights on the political platform on separate lines; can Hillary Clinton change that legacy through her journey to become president?” Smith wrote. “Because if she can…she would not only have my vote…but she would have my heart.”

I think Clinton would have the hearts of many if she makes a conscious effort to acknowledge and make room for our struggle. Most people like to ignore it. The grand question is if Clinton will ignore it as well.

Do you think Clinton will leave us behind? Do you agree with Jada’s thoughts about Clinton’s campaign?

Here is the FULL transcription of Smith’s Thoughts:

Race vs Gender

” Hillary Clinton is running for President. When Hillary made her announcement, I was more confused and anxious than excited. Her announcement conjured many old hurts and scars.

In the past, I have been criticized for suggesting that black women extend our media platforms to white women in the way in which white women are making strides to extend their media platforms to us, but Hillary’s announcement reminded me that the relationship between black and white women on the political platform has been deeply complicated, disappointing and painful. The only question I have been asking myself is if I’m suppose to vote for Hillary because she is a woman; will she take us to the mountaintop with her or will women of color once again be left out and left behind? For example, during the Woman’s Suffrage Movement, black women were specifically excluded because Northern white women feared of losing support of Southern white women if black women were included. What made it even more offensive is that the two women given the credit of pioneering the woman’s movement were at first abolitionists. Those were complicated times, but as time has gone on it seems as if that sentiment of separatism did not let up and permeated through the feminist movement as a place to facilitate and empower white women only. I personally suffered the racism and classism of the feminist movement and now have had to watch my daughter battle even ageism as she journeys to participate in the feminist movement. But she continues to fight the good fight referring to herself as a feminist while her mother refers to herself as a womanist who supports feminism and feminists. You can imagine that Willow and I have had some “spirited” conversations about this topic that’s uneasy for even a mother and daughter to talk about at times which simply illuminates how volatile a subject it could be for a nation of women to explore…but we must.

How will we reconcile the past to move into the future? Can Hillary, whether she becomes President or not, heal the broken political ties of the women of this nation? I know it takes far more than the idea of being the first female President of the United States to run this country, but as a woman, it sure is an exciting idea. Women of color and white women have been taking on the majority of their fights on the political platform on separate lines; can Hillary Clinton change that legacy through her journey to become president? Because if she can…she would not only have my vote…but she would have my heart.

To all my women friends of all colors and creeds, this is a great opportunity for healing and reconciliation… let’s woman up in the spirit of compassion to gain more understanding of one another and the issues we face. Let’s get the conversation started…”

J

 

Comment(21)

  1. I’m impressed, I have to say. Really hardly ever do I encounter a weblog that’s each educative and entertaining, and let me tell you, you might have hit the nail on the head. Your thought is outstanding; the difficulty is one thing that not enough persons are speaking intelligently about. I’m very blissful that I stumbled throughout this in my search for one thing referring to this.

  2. Aw, this was a really nice post. In idea I wish to put in writing like this moreover – taking time and precise effort to make an excellent article… however what can I say… I procrastinate alot and certainly not seem to get something done.

  3. Sorry for the huge review, but I’m really loving the new Zune, and hope this, as well as the excellent reviews some other people have written, will help you decide if it’s the right choice for you.

  4. Really! Who are some of the notable men who pushed Black women’s suffrage? Conversely, not to take anything from the brothers, but Black women have always been on the frontline and working beside Black men as well as working behind the scenes for social justice and equality for the betterment of the Black community. So, let’s not get it twiisted.

    Furthermore, as it concerns Black men, during the 2008 presidential campaign, Hilary stated that Obama would not be elected because he was not white. Need I say more on the topic.

    I take this opportunity to say, too, I am glad Loretta Lynch has finally been confirmed as the First African American woman to serve as the Attorney General for the U.S.Department of Justice. Congratulations

  5. Look Jada, take a pick, the republicans(any of them) and their expressed desire to take us back to the pre- civil war era or take our chance with the Democratic unknown. Massah is a word I don’t want to use or be flogged,boiled in oil or hung or de-balled. So lets not give any fuel to them. I gotta take Hillary.

  6. This is what confounds me about this conversation.President Obama-near as I can tell-is a man.More importantly,for women,he is a feminist.So,the notion that only women can help other women is nonsense. Furthermore,it was black men who together with the women of the Black Women’s Clubs,pushed suffrage for black women. Unfortunately,that story is seldom told or discussed because feminism has divided black men and women to where black women don’t even see when black men support them.Or its taken for granted.I don’t want Hillary at all.If she may not help black women,black men have no chance.But oh,I guess that does not matter.Then again,having a president who only helps women won’t be any different than Obama.

  7. Hillary Clinton and her husband showed their true colours during the 2008 campaign against Obama. Having said that I know that African Americans will forgive and forget. We are so good at forgiving and forgetting the injuries meted out to us by white people through the ages. Come on now my people, turn the other cheek!!

  8. is up to you to move foward the presidents job is to take the blame for all the fuck ups in the country is up to you women to move foward stop depending on some one to open doors for you open youre own daam doors

  9. The white woman has been set up to be pure, to be respected and cherished, while the black woman was made out to be hypersexual and crass. The white woman had to deal with the men sleeping with (or should it be better put, RAPING) black women, so they were rivals for the white man’s attention. So do you really think they feel equality with Black women? The feminist movement just wanted black women for numbers and never had their back. Sure, they were happy to have black women take care of their kids, but there was no respect. They also knew that by getting black women away from civil rights toward women’s rights it would dilute our struggle. It was nothing but a dividing tool. She (Hilary) is from a very racist state, and don’t think those views hadn’t sunk in. During her race against PREZ OBAMA, she showed her true racist colors. F-her.

  10. I remember Hillary and her racist clarion call to ‘working class white people’ in the 2008 election run. I remember her husband’s unwarranted attacks against Sister Souljah. I remember that the Clintons are from Arkansas, a confederate stronghold, with the 3rd highest execution rate in the country and the 3rd worst education system in the country. I have no hope at all that the clintons are in any way inclusive. I expect them to turn their backs on minorities and to feed minorities as red meat to their conservative electorate targets.

  11. Every one has valid point and I want to know how we can go about addressing the issue/ creating a forum/ developing questions that maybe we can have addressed and presented through the media to Hillary Clinton if not face to face?

  12. I so agree, Mrs. Smith…this is a conversation that is good for us to have on all social media…where is this being talked about more?

  13. Frankly, I prefer a candidate who has a proven record that reveals their commitment to women and one who has experience in addressing the complexities of the intersectionality of women. Like Jada, I am very concerned if Hillary is the best candidate to accomplish that. If we have no other choice, we must not only raise our concerns to Hilary, we must alo make our priorities known

  14. I too was thinking the same as Jada Smith glad she used her voice to speak up for Women of Color. I have to hear FROM H. Clinton how we will help to break the glass ceiling before I’m fully convinced.

  15. You need to reframe the question: Will Black women develop a representative political agenda to put forth to Hillary Clinton to adopt/integrate with her key policies and priorities in exchange for our support? Why take such a weak-ass position? Look at the Black Women’ Club Movement strategies. They were closer to slavery and further away from freedom yet they never talked to a politician on their knees and they moved social policy in this country in powerful ways.

    1. My response is not in response to Jada’s question. She is on point. My response is addressing the writer’s question about whether or not Hillary will leave us behind.

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